Tiger Eyes the Movie: Meeting Judy Blume, again, 30 years later

tiger eyes movie poster

Judy Blume is easily the first author I remember LOVING.  I was probably around seven when I read my first Judy Blume book. Tales of a Fourth Grade Nothing, and quickly headed to Barnes and Noble for more.  I had to read EVERYTHING she wrote.  Like most girls of my generation (that would be X) Judy Blume helped define our childhood and adolescence.

Deenie, Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret, Blubber and of course, Forever.  These books taught you something about being a girl – what might happen, what may have happened, what you hope didn’t happen – all of it perfectly written in exactly the right voice.

When I was 10 I waited for two hours with one of my best friends at the original Barnes and Noble in Manhattan to meet Judy Blume and get the first copy of Tiger Eyes.  That autographed copy of Tiger Eyes is one of the very few books that has moved with me from home to home – surviving over 30 years and 5 moves.  Like many of Judy’s (she told me to call her that!) books Tiger Eyes is about a strong, young girl named Davey on the verge of womanhood.  In Tiger Eyes she is also displaced, confused, and recovering from the sudden, violent death of her father.  It’s a much more mature book – not quite Forever, but definitely more hardened and sad than Margaret.

The film is very loyal to book,  beautifully shot and the lead actress, Willa Holland, is extraordinary.  I highly recommend it not just for Gen X women who grew up with Judy Blume, but also for older tween and teen girls.  It’s amazing to see how much Twilight and The Hunger Games follow in the footsteps of the Judy Blume tradition of smart, capable – slightly wounded, girls like Davey in Tiger Eyes.  It’s not action packed or fully of vampires and love triangles, but it has at its core those paradoxical feelings of adolescent sadness/joy, fear/courage, ignorance/wisdom that universally resonate at that age – particularly with girls.

Two weeks ago I had the privilege of attending a screening of the new film version of Tiger Eyes – and Judy Blume was there to take questions and sign books!

judy blume and lawrence blume

I was thrilled to dig out my copy of  Tiger Eyes from 1982.  Judy was shocked and touched to see her autograph from way back then  – she called over everyone to see it, and then signed the book anew here in 2013.

It was an awesome moment.  And I can tell you that there were many, many women in attendance that day who brought their original copies of Forever, Tiger Eyes and the other faves – tattered, battered and well-loved – for Judy to sign as well.

You can check out the main Tiger Eyes page to see if the film is coming to a theater near you, but it is also On Demand, and online on the usual outlets.

Wordless Wednesday Literary Flash Back

I love this list of the Top 10 Fiction and Non-Fiction books from the week I was born.  Courtesy of BibliOz.com.  Many of these were on my parents’ bookshelf growing up, which you can read all about in my post The Serendipty of My Family’s Library.

The Serendipity of My Family’s Library

The first time I held a Kindle in my hand I almost dropped it.  I have small hands and keeping the Kindle in its little cover required some maneuvering that I am not used to while reading.  I finally figured out the most comfortable way to hold the thing and read my way through Lorrie Moore’s A Gate at the Stairs easily enough, (though not knowing what page I was on while reading was MADDENING!)  Now, I knew that I wanted to read Lorrie Moore’s book before I headed to Mexico on this trip so I purchased it instantaneously and quite satisfactorily.  All in all the Kindle experience worked fine for me.  But, then I finished the book and I didn’t know what I wanted to read next.  I could’ve looked at Amazon’s recommendations, I could’ve downloaded The Help which my sister in -law was reading the old fashioned way, but staring at that blank gray screen I felt totally disconnected from the experience of choosing a book.  And for me picking my next great read is part of the whole reading process.

I grew up in a brownstone in Brooklyn NY.  What does this have to do with reading?  Well, brownstones were built back when people had libraries in their homes.  Entire rooms with floor to ceiling shelving just begging to be filled with books.  Our library even had a billiard table in it that my parents promptly moved to the basement.  This room with its leaded glass bay window, mahogany paneling and built in cushioned benches was the epitome of an old fashioned home library (oh yeah, that’s also where our TV was lest you think the hours spent in there were only for serious bookworming.)  Fortunately my parents had a lot of books.  Real books not those weird fake ones that people fill their McMansion libraries with nowadays.  Continue reading