Turn Your Kid into a Citizen Reporter and Reviewer With the New KidzVuz App!

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I am super excited to announce the launch of the first and only video creation and sharing app for kids!  After months of hard work with a team of fabulous developers, our KidzVuz app has hit the iTunes App Store!

What can kids do on the KidzVuz app?

First of all it’s awesome for travel.  No more eye-rolling or saying, “I’m bored.”  Now kids can create travel videos instantaneously, engaging and empowering them to be a part of the trip – and share their tips with other kids.

Got a budding foodie?  Instead of zoning out at the table with a game, let them make food reviews from the restaurant – who doesn’t want to know what’s beyond the kids’ menu?

And of course it’s great for movie, theater, sports, toy, tech, book and fashion reviews too.  (not to mention showing off music, dance and athletic skills)

Anywhere your kids goes they now have the ability to have their say on the go!

Plus, they can check out what other kids have to say BEFORE they buy something.  And so can their parents.

It’s totally monitored and moderated just like our main KidzVuz.com site and it’s FREE!

So, what are you waiting for?  It’s made for iPod Touch, iPhone, and iPad.  Download the app right now and please rate and review it in the iTunes store!  Have fun and have your say!

 

 

 

Thinking Different: The Real Legacy of Steve Jobs

The first computer our family ever owned was an Apple IIc.  I was around 12 years old when the white box appeared in our home, and truth be told we didn’t use it much.  Other than typing up school papers once in a while and printing them on the rickety printer with its perforated-edged paper it wasn’t quite clear why we needed a computer in our home.  After all, my math teacher at the time still insisted that we do all of our homework with carbon paper so we could keep a copy.  But there was something about that Apple with the little rainbow Apple logo there on the monitor that was accessible, friendly, even then.

When I went to college there were only a few students with their own computers.  Big, chunky, heavy monitors that took up an entire dorm sized desk and ran MS-DOS.  But, when I bought my own computer my sophomore year with the money I had “inherited” from my Great Aunt ($1,000) when she passed away I knew right away I wanted the Mac Classic.  Right out of the box a Mac worked as soon as you plugged it in.  The little Mac OS smile popped up and even on that tiny black and white screen you felt connected – not to the net – there was no real public internet yet – but to the computer itself.  I named it R2D2.  Yes I really did.  And I was not alone.  Everyone who owned a Mac named their computers, felt protective and connected in a way that PC owners did not.

But something else was true and that was that choosing to buy an Apple Computer made you different.  It was for “creative” types (non-Apple people didn’t say that as a good thing), you were not a serious person – a person meant for, or was in, business.  Of course those people spent hours trying to locate their files on some god-forsaken directory, or spent hours installing and figuring out how to set up their computers from the get go.  But still, that perception lingered.

When my boyfriend (now my husband) went to buy his first computer I went with him to make sure he bought a Mac Powerbook.  In color!  That’s how I knew I could marry him.  (Also, he looks a lot like Steve Jobs – A LOT – but I’m assuming that was just subliminal.)  And so it went.  Got the iMac G3 in Strawberry when that came out, a PowerBook G4 (again with inherited money when my grandfather died.  Again $1000), then another iMac, a MacBook and now a MacBook Pro.  And for most of that time people still looked down at the Mac.  Mac people were a “cult”; artists, writers, etc.  And Mac people came to embrace that.  When Apple launched their Think Different campaign they embraced that too.  I used to love walking by that giant billboard in SoHo of Jim Henson and Kermit the Frog with the Apple logo and the Think Different slogan.  When you owned a Mac you really did feel different – in all the best ways.

Then of course the rest of the world caught up with Apple.   The iPod, the iPhone, the iPad started making converts of so many.  Apple offered even the most conservative of computer users a way to embrace the connectivity and personalization of our new world.  People who for years interrogated me about my choice to use a Mac are now toting around a Mac Air or an iPad like it’s an extension of their body.  I’ll never forget the one family member who bought his daughter a Macbook a few years ago – the first Apple computer they had EVER owned – and he said to me with a look of total shock, “You know you just plug it in and it’s ready to go?” Yes, of course I knew that – I also knew that those who are the “creators” – the big thinkers, the ones who push limits or turn things inside out and backwards – finally started to feel vindicated.

There are so many people speculating about what Apple will look like without Steve Jobs‘ incredible vision and brilliance.  And it’s a real worry of course.  But I also think about how he turned so many ordinary people into daring creators through the ease and accessibility of the iPad and the Mac – how the iTunes store has given little ol’ me the power to podcast to thousands of listeners – or anyone the ability to record, edit and create films and music with ease – or entertain or just participate through an app on the iPad.  He has enabled and empowered kids to become the next visionaries through his products and design.  An entire generation of kids who are pushed to think differently – that’s the legacy I most want to see fulfilled.

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The Consumer Electronics Show: Days 1 & 2 Quick and Dirty Recap

Consumer Electronics Show

Image via Wikipedia

Right now I’m writing from my swanky Las Vegas hotel room in between attending the world’s second largest trade show – The Consumer Electronics Show (CES) – and heading out to dinner with my fabulous conference sponsor Microsoft Windows 7.   It’s not easy to fit in writing and reporting with all the booth touring, miles of walking and endless waits for shuttle buses to haul the over 125, 000 attendees back and forth to the convention center.  If you really want to know what an 8 hour day inside a massive structure, deprived of sunlight and under the glare of endless flat screen panel displays can do to you listen to our Blogging Angels Podcast for our exhausted, half-demented round up of day one.

As for me, I’m focusing on the brands I know and love and use as a mom and as a blogger.  (And as a tech geekess)  I arrived here with a new Windows Phone on loan from Microsoft. I’ve been playing with it for a about a week and so far I love the  intereface.  As a long time iPhone user I appreciate the very different look of the Windows Phone, the large tiles that allow for easy access and readability, the way you can customize the interface, the integration of Facebook with your contacts and the smart search functions.  Plus, the HTC phone I’m using has a huge screen.  At a show where tech is everywhere and everything it’s been fun to have a phone not many people have really seen or played with – a real conversation starter.

Booth Tours:

I’ve been to Kodak, Panasonic, Raw Talent Guitar, Neer Life and working the Microsoft Windows 7 booth at Mommy Tech.  Here’s my Twitter Feed from the last day and a half to give you an idea of everything I saw today.  There will a more detailed post after CES when I’ve had time to absorb the enormity of it all…

Excuse the typos – trying to tweet and listen and report on a phone doesn’t make for well checked tweets